News & Information

« Older Entries

Gynecological Oncology Events: Raising Awareness One Occassion at a Time

Teal 2

The Division of Gynecological Oncology at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) believes that early detection is the best prevention. Members of the Division routinely participate in community-based gynecological oncology events to spread awareness about different types of cancer, such as cervical, ovarian, uterine, vaginal, and vulvar. Recently, the Division continued this mission by participating in the Sixth Annual T.E.A.L. Walk/Run, as well as the Pap Rally and 5K Walk/Run.

Study Finds Genetic Anomalies Contribute to Congenital Heart Disease

Congenital Heart Disease

Author Helen Keller wrote, “The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen or even touched; they must be felt with the heart.” It’s a recognizable feeling to many expecting parents: to love their unborn child before he or she enters the world. But what happens when their heart is weakened due to congenital heart disease (CHD)? Will they be able to live a long, healthy, and loving life?

Baby Boom: Understanding the CDC’s Birth Rates for Older Women

Birth Rates for Older Women

“When are you going to have a baby?”

 

Chances are you will hear that question once – if not numerous times – during what is considered to be your “childbearing years.” And if you’re like many women in their late 30s and 40s who haven’t had a child, or would like to have another one in the future, the answer to this question can be worrisome as the difficulty of conceiving increases with age. But there’s good news.

A Moment in Time, a Lifetime of Privacy Issues?

It’s a visual that has been passed down from generation to generation, from the time you were a child to now as a parent: the classic collage hanging in the reception area of any pediatrician’s or obstetrician’s office. The framed faces of children for whom the physician has cared – oftentimes spanning the patient’s entire adolescent life – captures fragments of time, ranging from the first moment a baby enters the world to a professional shot of that same child graduating high school.

New Professorship Announced in Ob/Gyn for Hillary Rodham Clinton

 Dr. Lynn L. Simpson

Dr. Lynn L. Simpson

A recent donation to Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons will fund a new professorship named for Hillary Rodham Clinton in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Dr. Lynn L. Simpson, chief of the Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine and professor of obstetrics and gynecology, was selected as the first holder of this appointment. This marks the fourth endowed chair to be added to the Department since 2011.

Dr. Mark Sauer’s Response to Marcy Darnovsky’s New York Times Op-Ed, “Genetically Modified Babies”

New York Times

Research to Save Lives: A Response to “Genetically Modified Babies” by Marcy Darnovsky, Executive Director at the Center for Genetics and Society (Op-Ed, Feb. 25)

 

Every year, thousands of women give birth to children who will die as infants or young adults because of severe mitochondrial diseases. The procedure of mitochondrial transfer holds much promise of enabling these women to have healthy babies and removes the risk of disease in these children’s future offspring.

Dr. Mary D’Alton Weighs in on Brain Death and Pregnancy

Mary D'Alton, MD

Mary D’Alton, MD

New York Times op-ed columnist, Frank Bruni, examines a Texas law that compels hospitals to provide life support to brain-dead women who are pregnant.  He spoke with Dr. Mary D’Alton, Chair of the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at CUMC, who discussed the chances of the fetus surviving and the possible risks in fetal development.

Promising Ovarian Cancer Treatment Highlighted

Sharyn Lewin, MD

CBS News has reported on an experimental study of hyperthermic intraoperative chemotherapy (HIPEC), also known as heated chemotherapy, led by one of our gynecologic oncologists Dr. Sharyn Lewin. HIPEC has been previously used in treating other cancers, such as appendix and late stage color cancer. In this method, the chemotherapy is heated to approximately 108 degrees Fahrenheit, rather than standard room temperature.

« Older Entries