Clinical Trials

  • Principal Investigator

    Carolyn L. Westhoff, MD
    The UPA Breast Study will investigate a medication called ulipristal acetate (UPA), which is currently used as an emergency contraceptive and as a treatment for fibroids. The study is designed to investigate 1) whether taking UPA daily can decrease breast cell proliferation compared to traditional combined oral contraceptive pills; and 2) whether MRI can replace biopsies in future research studies investigating breast proliferation, as substituting biopsies for MRI would make future studies easier for women to take part in. Study participation will last 4-5 months.
  • Principal Investigator

    Jason D. Wright, MD
    This study will only include women who have platinum sensitive relapsed epithelial ovarian cancer meaning your ovarian cancer did not return for at least 6 months after your first treatment with chemotherapy containing platinum (carboplatin or cisplatin). This research is being done to find out if carboplatin plus paclitaxel or carboplatin plus Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin (PLD), chemotherapies (anticancer drugs) that are used to treat ovarian cancer, work better alone or when given with a study drug called farletuzumab.
  • Principal Investigator

    Jason D. Wright, MD
    A single arm, open-label, Phase IIb study to assess the efficacy and safety of the combination of cediranib and olaparib tablets in women with recurrent platinum resistant epithelial ovarian cancer, including Fallopian tube and/or primary peritoneal cancer who do not carry a deleterious or suspected deleterious germline BRCA mutation.
  • Principal Investigator

    Rachana Gavara, MD
    This is a study of patients delivering at Columbia University Medical Center-Allen Hospital. The investigators will compare the change in maternal hemoglobin from postpartum day 1 to day 2 and also try to find out if there is a correlation between estimated blood loss and measured blood loss.
  • Principal Investigator

    Paula M. Castano, MD, MPH
    Columbia University is conducting a contraceptive clinical trial looking at two intrauterine devices, one of which is investigational. Pre-menopausal women ages 16-40 who are generally healthy, sexually active, at risk for pregnancy, and are not at risk for sexually transmitted infections may qualify.
  • Principal Investigator

    Paula M. Castano, MD, MPH
    Columbia University is conducting a contraceptive clinical trial looking at two intrauterine devices, one of which is investigational. Pre-menopausal women ages 16-40 who are generally healthy, sexually active, at risk for pregnancy, and are not at risk for sexually transmitted infections may qualify.
  • Principal Investigator

    Jason D. Wright, MD
    The LIGHT study is a clinical research study for women who have been diagnosed with ovarian cancer. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of an investigational drug in women with this type of cancer, using genetic information to evaluate tumors.
  • Principal Investigator

    Carolyn L. Westhoff, MD
    Tired of having to remember to take your birth control? If you are a woman between the ages of 18 and 35, are pre-menopausal, sexually active and do NOT wish to become pregnant, you are invited to see if you may qualify for a research study. The purpose of this research study is to test the effectiveness of an investigational contraceptive vaginal ring. If you qualify, you will receive investigational study medication, study-related medical exams, and laboratory services at no charge. You may also be reimbursed for time, travel, and other expenses.
  • Principal Investigator

    Jason D. Wright, MD
    Atezolizumab is an antibody that affects your immune system by blocking the PD L1 pathway. An antibody is a large, Y-shaped protein used by your bodys immune system to identify and kill foreign objects, such as bacteria, viruses, and tumor cells. The PD L1 pathway is involved in the decrease of your bodys natural immune response to fight cancer. By blocking the PD-L1 pathway, atezolizumab may help your immune system to stop or reverse the growth of tumors. You will also receive treatment with paclitaxel, carboplatin, and bevacizumab.
  • Principal Investigator

    June Y. Hou, MD
    The main purpose of this study is to: Learn about the safety of REGN4018 and to find out what dose of REGN4018 can be given alone or in combination with cemiplimab to research subjects with ovarian cancer without too many side effects. The study will also look at the levels of REGN4018 and/or cemiplimab in the body and measure how well your body can remove the study drug(s). This is called pharmacokinetics. The study will also look at any signs that REGN4018 alone or with cemiplimab can treat cancer.

Pages